St. Bernard's Pass

My name is Brandon Bernard. I'm a graphic designer, storyboard and layout artist, and writer. I was born and raised in Albuquerque, NM, and lived in Los Angeles for 12 years, then in Austin, TX, for about a year, and I'm now in Brooklyn, NY. This blog is a virtual scrapbook of things that inspire me. Unless otherwise specified, the work here is not mine. Anything else you'd like to know? Feel free to hit up my "ask" box!

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    9 posts tagged star trek

    chaosneverwhere:

    Arena by Matt Taylor #startrek

    (via twofistedpulp)

    I was watching Star Trek episodes on Netflix the other day, and happened to pause it while Patrick Stewart was making this awkward, glazed-over expression. Decided to draw it, of course.

    thekhooll:

    Kirk

    I’m a Star Wars fan at heart, and have never given Star Trek a fair shake. But JJ Abrams’ new take got me curious, and I’ve been watching all the First Generation episodes on Netflix, and having a surprisingly good time doing so. The show is so much more self-aware of its campiness than I thought it was, and Shatner does a great job of fusing Buster Crabbe’s golden-boy Flash Gordon heroics with Sean Connery’s James Bond cool.

    @#$*yeahmovieposters:

    Star Trek Into Darkness

    (via booklungs)

    tymn:

    “He’s dead, Jim.”

    Command Insignia, Star Trek (1966)

    I’m starting work today as a designer in BLT & Associates' home entertainment division, the people responsible for bringing you the slick DVD packaging above… May I live long and prosper.

    The Big 2009 KEY ART AWARDS Post — Follow-Up

    A couple weeks ago, I posted my own picks from the 2009 Key Art Awards movie posters categories, even though the ceremony had been held a couple nights prior and the actual winners were already known.

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    At that time, I promised a follow-up to show which ones actually won, versus my favorites. I’m running a little behind on this, but when Magliette reblogged my original Key Art Awards post yesterday, it reminded me to get cracking on it, so here we go!

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    WINNER Action/Adventure Posters (Rated PG-13 and Below)

    (poster designed by BLT & Associates)

    MY PICK: The same one. Live long and prosper!

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    WINNER Action/Adventure Posters (Rated R and above)

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

    MY PICK: The same one. Yay!

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    WINNER Animation Posters

    (poster designed in-house at Disney/Pixar, presumably)

    MY PICK: The same one.

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    WINNER Comedy Posters (Rated PG-13 and below)

    (poster designed by Mojo)

    MY PICK: The same — score!

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    WINNER Comedy Posters (Rated R and above)

    (poster designed by Crew Creative Advertising)

    MY PICK:

    (poster designed by Mojo)

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    WINNER Documentary Posters

    (poster designed by The Ant Farm)

    MY PICK:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    WINNER Drama Posters (Rated PG-13 and below)

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

    MY PICK:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    WINNER Drama Posters (R and Above)

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

    MY PICK: The same. After falling off there for a while, I’m back on!

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    WINNER Horror Posters

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

    MY PICK:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    WINNER International Posters

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

    MY PICK:

    (poster designed by Jeremy Saunders)

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    WINNER Teaser Posters (Rated PG-13 and below)

    (poster designed by Mojo)

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

    "[Insert star’s name] is a Basterd."

    (poster designed by Gravillis Inc.)

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    WINNER Electronic Print

    Okay, this category didn’t appear at IMPAwards, so I didn’t make a selection, although in the original Key Art Award post, I praised the Terminator: Salvation motion picture. So I guess that’s my pick. And guess what? That’s what won, too! Click here to see it in action. (Poster designed by Art Machine, A Trailer Park Company)

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    BEST IN SHOW

    Again, I didn’t make an official selection for this. I guess I’m a little surprised by what won this category, but don’t confuse my surprise with dismay. I like this poster a lot:

    (poster designed by BLT & Associates)

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    BEST IN SHOW — Special Recognition

    Ah-ha! Even though it seems they had to create a category in order to honor this poster, I’m glad they somehow acknowledged the brilliance of this campaign:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    In summation, I correctly guessed only 7 out of 14 categories. I wouldn’t have given the game away quite so much to Ignition Print, although it’s hard not to have them populate the winner’s circle — often times, the categories are packed with contenders out of their shop. I think I favored them 5 times, versus the 8 times they actually won in a category. I’m pretty disappointed by all the Tyler Perry movie posters that were honored, especially in such cases as their “inspiration” seems disingenuous, such as the I Can Do Bad All By Myself/Straw Dogs debacle. And my feelings about the “He was dead… But he got better” copy line have been well-documented elsewhere on this blog. But overall, it seems like the Key Art Awards this year was a good showing, and that the ceremony is not quite yet fraught with the falseness that besets more widely-publicized events like the Oscars.

    The Big 2009 KEY ART AWARDS Post

    A few days ago, the Hollywood Reporter hosted the 39th Annual Key Art Awards, a ceremony something like the Oscars for print and A/V campaigns in the entertainment industry. In plain English: an awards ceremony for movie posters and trailers.

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    Now, I know little or nothing about the audio/visual part of it, but my primary training as a graphic designer is as an entertainment marketing print designer, so I follow the movie poster aspect of things with keen interest.

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    Before I find out who took home the trophy in the various categories, I’d like to make my own picks. I’ll post a follow-up to this later, in which I show the actual winners.

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    Action/Adventure Posters (Rated PG-13 and Below) — The nominees are Star Trek, Taken, 2012 (two different posters), and Where the Wild Things Are. Now I’m not sure to what extent the Key Art Awards judges consider the entire print campaigns for these movies, but if I had to pick a favorite just among the poster thumbnails being shown at IMPawards, I’d have to say my favorite is the daringly-abstract Star Trek final one-sheet:

    (poster designed by BLT & Associates)

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    Action/Adventure Posters (Rated R and above) — The nominees in this category are Crank 2: High Voltage, District 9, Gamer, The International, and Ninja Assassin. Once again, I don’t really know how much impact the entire campaign has within these categories; the overall campaign for District 9 was stunning, including “Humans Only” propaganda in theater lobbies as well as on bus benches, and just about everywhere you looked. They completely transformed the landscape, and maybe even the industry itself (just a little bit). None of the very graphic red-black-and-white “Humans Only” posters are shown, and the representative posters in this category are, as a whole, not all that impressive to me, but I’m still going with District 9:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    Animation Posters — The nominees are Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs, Coraline, Ice Age 2: Dawn of the Dinosaurs, 9, and Up. This one’s pretty much a no-brainer for me. Up, for it’s iconic typography and very clean look:

    (poster designed in-house at Disney/Pixar, presumably)

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    Comedy Posters (Rated PG-13 and below) — The nominees are Cold Souls, Couples Retreat, (500) Days of Summer, Gentlemen Broncos, and Splinterheads. It’s a bit of a tough category, because aside from Couples Retreat (which doesn’t really seem to even belong next to these competitors) these are all really beautiful. Cold Souls, however, is apparently a pretty unabashed rip-off of some ads that ran in Germany, so I can kind of count that one off. I think my favorite of the group is (500) Days of Summer. With its blend of hand-drawn sketch and photo-collage, it exemplifies the “indy movie” look, and will probably be imitated ad nauseam. For now, though, it’s a beautiful thing to behold:

    (poster designed by Mojo)

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    Comedy Posters (Rated R and above) — The nominees are Away We Go, The Hangover, The Men Who Stare At Goats, Woodstock, and Trailer Park Boys: Countdown to Liquor Day. I have no idea what that last movie even is, and its poster doesn’t look that great, so that’s an easy elimination for me (if this is a film advertising award, after all, it can’t be a good thing if the campaign failed to register in the minds of consumers, and I consider myself on the more movie-savvy end of the spectrum). For me, the easy choice is Away We Go, which simply looks unlike any other movie poster I’ve seen in the past decade (and that’s a modest estimate):

    (poster designed by Mojo)

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    Documentary Posters — The nominees are The Cove, Food, Inc., It Might Get Loud, More Than a Game, and This Is It. Ironically, my choice in this category is a poster for the one doc on this list that I haven’t heard of (which pretty much negates my snarky comment above on Trailer Park Boys; sorry, boys). I pick More Than a Game:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    Drama Posters (Rated PG-13 and below) — The nominees are The Blind Side, Duplicity, I Can Do Bad All By Myself, Nine, and 12. Gotta say, this category is not too exciting this year. Surely there were some better drama posters this year? The Blind Side is…typical; I Can Do Bad All By Myself meaninglessly rips off the old Straw Dogs one-sheet; Nine is totally missable, and 12 is all right, but somehow it doesn’t just thrill me. By default, I guess I’m picking Duplicity, even though this slick, modernist design was executed better a few years back with the Inside Man poster:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    Drama Posters (R and Above) — The nominees are The Baader Meinhof Complex, Brothers, Hurt Locker, Precious, and Up In the Air. I guess our dramas need an R rating before they get interesting key-art. This category is pretty ripe with luscious fruits. (Many people on IMPawards have bad-mouthed the Brothers one-sheet, but I just want to go on the record as saying I think it perfectly and beautifully conveys the themes of the film, such as I understand them from the trailer!) My pick, simply because I appreciate the old-school painted effect, is Precious. That being said, I do have to add that I don’t feel the overall campaign for Precious was very strong. None of its posters seem to belong to the same movie, and some are even pretty lazy rip-offs. But the one submitted in this category is very nice:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    Horror Posters — The nominees are The Final Destination, Grace, The Haunting in Connecticut, Saw VI, and The Uninvited. I confess, this isn’t my favorite category. For the same reason that I won’t watch horror movies, I can barely stand to look at most horror posters. But I thought the one-sheet for The Final Destination was a successful exercise in crafting iconic, memorable imagery, without relying on blood and guts for its impact:

    (poster designed by Ignition Print)

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    International Posters — The nominees are Antichrist, A Christmas Carol, The Horsemen, The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus, and My Bloody Valentine 3-D. Not surprisingly, this category is crowded with solid contenders. The international posters tend to get away with more innovative work than what movie executives (or is it the general public?) allow designers here in the States. I would be remiss to not give an honorable mention to the German A Christmas Carol poster, but how can first place be awarded to anything but the Antichrist poster? It seems to me to be the pinnacle of what any graphic designer strives to do. Its image is so deceptively simple, but its meanings are manifold, and different depending on what each individual viewer brings to it. For example, I saw the poignancy and irony of a situation where two lovers can only kiss at the expense of severing something; someone else pointed out the menstrual symbology. Who knows what else might be taken from such a bold image?

    (poster designed by Jeremy Saunders)

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    Teaser Posters (Rated PG-13 and below) — The nominees are I Can Do Bad All By Myself, Madea Goes to Jail, Terminator: Salvation, Up, and Where the Wild Things Are. Well, Tyler Perry movie posters are well-represented here, but I have to say those aggravate me more than awe me. Consider I Can Do Bad All By Myself, which is represented in this category by a rip-off of a number of sources, but mainly this one, and on top of that it has nothing to do with any of the other posters for this same movie, including the one I previously complained was a blatant Straw Dogs knock-off. More often than not, the same Tyler Perry movie will look alternately like a comedy and a drama depending on which poster you’re looking at! It’s just not good marketing, and it’s questionable ethics, too. So I can easily scratch those two out of this category. Terminator: Salvation was a pretty awesome motion-poster, but in its motionless version it leaves a little something to be desired. Again, it’s tempting to award this category to Up, for the same reasons I picked Up in the Animation category. But I find myself particularly stirred by the teaser poster for Where the Wild Things Are, and that’s my final decision:

    (poster designed by Mojo)

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    Teaser Posters (Rated R and above) — The nominees are Crank 2: High Voltage, District 9, Precious, The Ugly Truth, and Zombieland. Once again, this particular poster for Precious is an uninspired imitation of this via a done-to-death Saul Bass treatment, so I’m going to disqualify it in my mind. I’m surprised at the selection for District 9 in this category: why not the white-red-and-black “Humans Only” signs? I felt The Ugly Truth had a nice humorous graphic approach to its teaser, but at the end of the day what was most memorable from this crop was the Zombieland teaser:

    (poster designed by Pulse Advertising)

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    Best Copy Line — The nominees are “He was dead… But he got better” (Crank 2: High Voltage), “This is not a love story. This is a story about love” ((500) Days of Summer), “Brad Pitt is a Basterd” (Inglourious Basterds), “No goats. No glory” (The Men Who Stare At Goats), and “There’s one in all of us” (Where the Wild Things Are). There’s been a lot of love for the Crank 2 tagline, but doesn’t anyone realize this is stolen right out of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, during the “bring out your dead” scene? John Cleese is trying to dump his father with the local “dead collector,” but his father is protesting that he’s not quite dead yet. Cleese insists his father is close enough, and his father says, “I’m getting better!” (Also, in the witch-burning scene, Eric Idle says the alleged witch turned him into a newt. When every gapes at his perfectly ordinary appearance, he mumbles, “I got better.”) For me, the (500) Days of Summer tagline is pretty great. It has that rare quality of feeling like it’s not working too hard, but at the same time it’s pretty profound, and perfectly sets the stage for the narrative. But in the end, I have to doff my cap to Brad Pitt and the rest of the cast of Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds for putting aside their star-egos and allowing themselves to be called “Basterds” in big stenciled letters all over the sides of buildings and on billboards and the sides of busses. Bravo!

    (poster designed by Gravillis Inc.)

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